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Monday, November 3
 

7:30am

Morning Beverages
Monday November 3, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am
Grand Station Foyer

7:30am

Registration
Monday November 3, 2014 7:30am - 3:30pm
Grand Station Foyer

8:30am

T3: The NAVAIR TPI Story: From Software Process Improvement to Process Improvement for All
We began implementing TSP across NAVAIR in 1996, first with PSP training and then TSP team coaching in 1998. By 2005 some members of our organizations began to ask, “Can we apply this successful approach to our other projects?” Our response was a resounding YES that ran squarely into non-software teams saying, “We don’t do software.” Our conclusion was that the “S” (in TSP) had to go!

By this time, the SW-CMM had evolved to the CMMI designed to be best practices for all kinds of software/system development and maintenance. Certainly the maxim Plan the Work–Work the Plan–Collect the Data–Report the Status made sense to all sorts of teams doing software, systems, requirements, and testing. In 2006 NAVAIR and the SEI collaborated in the development of processes, training, and tools to launch a set of teams doing software, system requirements, lab support, and CM/DM support. From those experiences, we arrived where we are today, applying something we call Team Process Integration (TPI).

This TPI half-day tutorial will focus on the steps that any technical team must go through to learn and apply personal and team process. This includes learning the fundamentals of what a process is, defining their own widget processes, and learning the fundamentals of estimating and quality, the steps of a detailed planning session (launch), project operations, weekly communications, and finally a tool to automate the combined TPI project management and team product processes.

This presentation will demonstrate NAVAIR’s top-level approach to the relationship between product processes, the data collected and used during development, and how the data is used to analyze the quality of the product. It will also include a discussion of the process for future improvement.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Hodgins

Brad Hodgins

NAVAIR
Brad Hodgins is an SEI-Certified Software Developer, SEI-Certified PSP/TSP Instructor, SEI-Authorized TSP Coach, and interim TSP Mentor Coach for the Process Resource Team of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) at China Lake, California. He developed a process framework for engineering teams and was awarded a Navy patent for the Learning Applying Mastering Perfecting model for team process implementation evaluation and improvement. Brad has... Read More →
avatar for David Saint-Amand

David Saint-Amand

NAVAIR
David Saint-Amand is a process improvement coach with the Process Resource Team of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Previous positions include DCS Corporation Section Manager, Naval Operations Research Analyst, Engineering Geologist, and Seismic Safety Consultant. He is a Defense Acquisition University–Certified Level III Life Cycle Logistician, a Software Engineering Institute (SEI)–Certified Personal Software Process (PSP... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Schwalb

Jeff Schwalb

NAVAIR
Jeff Schwalb is a computer scientist who has been with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division since 1984. In 2000, Jeff began working with the Systems Engineering Department at China Lake as a member of the People Product Process Resource (P3R) enterprise team to support Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) with improvement of organizational development and engineering processes as a way of delivering quality products on cost and schedule... Read More →


Monday November 3, 2014 8:30am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

8:30am

T1: Software Lifecycle Recipes: Making a Process Do What You Want It to Do—Building a Great Product, Meeting Customer Needs, Managing Time, Money, Risk, and Quality
Is your process huge, complicated, and full of bells and whistles? Does it look nice, create lots of paper and meetings, but not result in a great system? In this tutorial, you will start with a basic implementation of Scrum (as an example starting point) and adapt it to meet the needs of your customers, team, and organization. The method of adapting a process can then be used back in your own work place (Agile or not).

The interest in Agile, CMMI, and PSP/TSP development practices continues to grow as companies seek more efficient methods of developing software while meeting market demands for delivery. These methods can help organizations face end-user issues early and provide a mechanism to deliver incremental functionality to customers. However, implementations don't always go as planned, and without some due diligence, chaos is easy.

This tutorial will do three things:
  1. Teach an Agile/Scrum process as a base framework
  2. Explain how to evolve the framework to address specific project goals and problems
  3. Demonstrate how to start with a basic framework and evolve it using practices from PSP/TSP, ISO, CMMI, etc.
Learning Outcomes
  • Learn a basic framework for managing software projects
  • Identify what risks and challenges exist, given your organization’s complexity
  • Learn to evolve a framework to fit your organization’s situation

Speakers
avatar for Neil Potter

Neil Potter

The Process Group
Neil Potter is co-founder of The Process Group, a company formed in 1990 that consults on process improvement, software engineering, and project management. Neil has 26 years of experience in software and process engineering. He is an SEI-certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Intro to CMMI instructor, Six Sigma Greenbelt, and Certified Scrum Master. He has a B.Sc. in computer science from the University of Essex (UK) and is the co-author of Making... Read More →


Monday November 3, 2014 8:30am - 5:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

8:30am

T2: Empowering Teams with Great Data: Using the Process Dashboard
Successful project management leverages well-chosen tools to establish an empowered culture. Accordingly, tool expertise (or lack thereof) can either enable or limit the effectiveness of your process-improvement efforts. This tutorial shows participants how to perform many project-management techniques using the open-source Process Dashboard application. The session is designed to benefit both those new to the Dashboard who wish to jump-start their training and experienced users of the Dashboard who seek a higher level of mastery. Participants will be provided with the experience and skills to use the tool more effectively so that their teams and organizations can work smarter, with less overhead.

Tutorial topics include the following:

1. Team Planning (Launch)
  • Preparing for a successful project launch
  • Leveraging Dashboard functionality to empower and accelerate team planning efforts
2. Team Working
  • Collecting data, managing team and personal plans, and facilitating team work
  •  Understanding and customizing reports to monitor team progress, pinpoint project problems, and report to management
3. Postmortem and Replan (Relaunch)

4. Deeper Understanding
  • Insight into the underlying data and tool architecture to accelerate mastery of the Dashboard
5. Advanced Topics
  •  Tips for using the Dashboard more effectively
  •  Advanced features for high-maturity teams
Attendees who bring a laptop computer will benefit from hands-on experience as they follow along with the demonstrations.

Learning Outcomes
  • Use the Process Dashboard confidently during TSP launches
  • Use the tool more effectively and work smarter, with less overhead
  • Apply advanced techniques for project planning and tracking
  • Transition these skills to others in your organization

Speakers
avatar for David Tuma

David Tuma

Tuma Solutions
David Tuma | After graduating from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, David Tuma encountered the Team Software Process as a member of a TSP project team in 1998. Immensely impressed by the power and elegance of PSP and TSP, he created an open source tool called the Process Dashboard to help advance the broader usage of TSP around the world. He continues to support the TSP community as the architect and lead developer of the Process... Read More →


Monday November 3, 2014 8:30am - 5:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

10:00am

Morning Break
Monday November 3, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Grand Station Foyer

12:00pm

Lunch
Monday November 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 2

1:00pm

T4: Strategic Management of Technical Debt
The metaphor of technical debt acknowledges that development teams sometimes accept compromises in a system in one dimension (for example, modularity) to meet an urgent demand in another dimension (for example, a deadline), and that such compromises incur a “debt.” If not properly managed, the interest on this debt may accrue, hampering system stability and quality and impacting the team’s ability to deliver enhancements at a pace that satisfies business needs.

Although unmanaged debt can have disastrous results, strategically managed debt can help organizations take advantage of time-sensitive opportunities, fulfill market needs, and acquire stakeholder feedback. Because architecture has such leverage within the overall development lifecycle, strategic management of architectural debt is important.

This tutorial introduces practical aspects of managing technical debt. During this session, we will discuss the technical-debt metaphor and learn about techniques for measuring and communicating technical debt. We will play the Hard Choices game, an engaging technique for communicating the tradeoffs of technical-debt management to colleagues and managers. After the game, we’ll compare strategies and share practices to help make these choices. We will conclude by raising awareness of efforts to provide software engineers a foundation for managing tradeoffs based on models of their economic impacts.

Learning Outcomes
  • Understand key concepts
  • Acquire a technique for communicating the tradeoffs of technical debt to colleagues and managers
  • Learn about practical tools and techniques that can address part of the problem today
  • Gain knowledge of a foundation for managing tradeoffs based on models of economic impacts

Speakers
avatar for Neil Ernst

Neil Ernst

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Neil Ernst is Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He researches the intersection of requirements engineering, quality attributes, and agile and iterative development. This includes developing new theoretical frameworks, conducting empirical studies, and communicating results to the wider community. Recent publications include an article in the Journal of Empirical Software Engineering and the... Read More →
avatar for Robert Nord

Robert Nord

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Robert Nord is a senior member of the technical staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. He is engaged in activities focusing on agile and architecting at scale and works to develop and communicate effective methods and practices for software architecture. His collaboration with Philippe Kruchten and Ipek Ozkaya is helping shape the research agenda on technical debt. He is co-author of the practitioner-oriented books Applied... Read More →
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ipek Ozkaya is a senior member of the technical staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). With her team at the SEI, she works to help organizations improve their software development efficiency and system evolution. Her work focuses on software architecture practices, software economics, and requirements management. Her latest publications include articles on agile architecting, dependency management, and architectural... Read More →


Monday November 3, 2014 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

2:30pm

Afternoon Break
Monday November 3, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Station Foyer
 
Tuesday, November 4
 

7:30am

Morning Beverages
Tuesday November 4, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am
Grand Station Foyer

7:30am

Registration
Tuesday November 4, 2014 7:30am - 3:30pm
Grand Station Foyer

8:15am

8:35am

Keynote: Case Study of Toyota Unintended Acceleration and Software Safety

Investigations into potential causes of Unintended Acceleration (UA) for Toyota vehicles have made news several times in the past few years. Some blame has been placed on floor mats and sticky throttle pedals. But a jury trial verdict found that defects in Toyota's Electronic Throttle Control System (ETCS) software and safety architecture caused a fatal mishap. This verdict was based in part on a wide variety of computer hardware and software issues. This talk will outline key events in the still-ongoing Toyota UA story and pull together the technical issues that have been discovered by NASA and other experts. The results paint a picture that should inform not only future designers of safety-critical software for automobiles but also all computer-based system designers.


Keynotes
avatar for Philip Koopman

Philip Koopman

Dr. Philip Koopman is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has worked in the areas of wearable computers, software robustness, embedded networking, dependable embedded computer systems, and autonomous vehicle safety. Previously, he was a submarine officer in the U.S. Navy, an embedded CPU architect for Harris Semiconductor, and an embedded system researcher at United Technologies... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 8:35am - 9:35am
Grand Station Ballroom 1

9:40am

Architectural Insights into Planning a Legacy System Modernization
Many legacy systems were built decades ago using the technologies available at the time and have been operating successfully for many years. But they suffer from being built with components that are becoming obsolete, high licensing costs for COTS components, awkward user interfaces, and business processes that evolved based on expediency rather than optimality. In addition, new software engineers familiar with current technology are unfamiliar with the domain; documentation is scarce and outdated; the business rules are likely to be embedded in code that was written in an obsolete language using obsolete data structures; and the cadre of aging domain experts maintaining them is unfamiliar with newer technologies.

There are a number of optional large-grained approaches to modernization. We propose a rational way of using system architectural concepts to develop architectural options, create a scorecard, apply the scorecard, and present the results with recommendations to decision makers. The approach includes four steps:
  1. Determine and score the options and make decisions.
  2. Explore implementation alternatives.
  3. Build a target architecture.
  4. Build a roadmap to move over time to the target architecture.
The presentation will describe how this approach was applied to a large-scale IT modernization effort.

Speakers
avatar for Phil Bianco

Phil Bianco

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Philip Bianco is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). He holds an MS in software engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a BS with Honors in computer science from the University of Pittsburgh. Currently, he provides direct support for DoD and DHS in the area of software architecture as part of the Software Solutions Division at the SEI. Research topics included tools to... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gagliardi

Michael Gagliardi

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for William Wood

William Wood

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Mr. Wood has worked at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute for the last 25 years and has performed a combination of research activities and customer-interactive activities. He currently works in the Software Solutions Division, focusing on developing and implementing methods that can be used to expose risks in a system or system-of-systems architecture. The evaluation methods are based on the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 9:40am - 10:20am
Grand Station Ballroom 3

9:40am

The Executive View: Beyond the Methodology
On my first day as the executive of a large delivery organization, both my client and my manager described the challenge ahead by describing our past performance: abysmal. Poor quality, late projects, budgetary overruns, and an unprofitable business model. We were under intense pressure to improve fast, and we needed to make radical changes quickly and discontinuously.

We leveraged tools from the CMMI methodology and Team Software Process training to fight this battle, but we didn't start on a journey to seek certification. While that was a result of our journey, our approach went beyond the methodology to drive superior performance. We focused on using these powerful tools to solve critical business problems.

We created a Pareto of everything that was wrong with our development organization. We focused on the biggest problems until we hit the 20% of problems that represented 80% of our pain. As we solved the first bar of the Pareto, quality, we also made huge dents in the second bar, on-time delivery. By the time we hit our 20% marker, we had addressed several other problems as well. First Time Quality improved by 66%, on-time delivery improved by 30%, budgetary overruns dropped by 37%, attrition dropped by over 30%, and profit increased by 12%.

Our client and our management acknowledged these improvements, for a minute, and then quickly turned their attention to the next 10 problems. I made a realization—we live in a world of Paretos. Your client, your leadership, and your team will always have a Pareto of what needs improvement. As an exceptional leader, you need to be aware of the Pareto and constantly manage the 20%. That is, are you dealing with imperatives (e.g., cost, schedule, quality, attrition), or are you dealing with nice-to-haves (flexibility, thought leadership, more speed, more profit)? All are equally important from your client's perspective, but from a software-engineering excellence perspective, fixing the imperatives is a survival skill; fixing the nice-to-haves will set you apart.

Speakers
avatar for David VanEpps

David VanEpps

Acxiom
David VanEpps serves as Automotive Delivery Director for Acxiom Corporation, a role he has held since 2010. In this role, he manages architecture, software delivery and sustainment, production operations, and marketing campaign delivery. Prior to his role at Acxiom, Mr. VanEpps was in a similar delivery role at OnStar at a time when the company grew six-fold. Mr. VanEpps graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 9:40am - 10:20am
Grand Station Ballroom 4

9:40am

TSP in Non-implementation Phases: An Experience in How Disciplined Measurement Has Helped Overcome Obstacles in Deploying TSP in Mexican Organizations
Many of the companies that have had a successful PACE (Performance and Capability Evaluation) have been Mexican. And several of these companies not only have implemented TSP in software development processes but also have done it in processes that are key to achieving successful projects and high-quality products. We're talking about processes like Requirements Analysis, High-Level Design, and Solution Architecture.

These first TSP implementations in processes that do not develop software shared the following experiences:
  • They customized planning and quality metrics and committed to follow disciplined measurement activities, even when traditional tools and repositories were adjusted.
  • On average, these organizations could have been defined as small and medium enterprises. But even as very small entities, these projects were based on self-directed teams committed to challenging and achievable goals and encouraged a successful cross-training that team members consciously followed.
  • All the companies implemented TSP cycles for the first time in their organizations. Some started with non-development software projects in which virtually all productive roles in the organization (analysts, architects, developers, testers) participated, which substantially reduced the resistance to change and motivated senior executives to continue the TSP implementation in subsequent cycles of the projects.
This talk shares the challenges and solutions that we faced in these cases and how the circumstances of these projects reinforced the path toward cultural change promoted by TSP in the organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Blanca Gil

Blanca Gil

Software Industry Excellence Center de Mexico
Blanca Gil is a certified TSP instructor and a TSP Coach candidate who has coached several teams in Mexico and Guatemala. She has over 20 years of experience in IT areas, particularly in quality process and software engineering. She is an engineer with an MS in software engineering and a PhD candidate at the ETS of Canada. She is a member of the Mexican delegation to the ISO/IEC and co-editor of the ISO/IEC 29110 standard for VSE. Currently she... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 9:40am - 10:20am
Grand Station Ballroom 5

10:20am

Morning Break
Tuesday November 4, 2014 10:20am - 10:35am
Grand Station Foyer

10:35am

An Incremental Life-Cycle Assurance Strategy for Critical System Certification
We present an architecture-led incremental assurance strategy throughout the development life cycle to address the challenges of certifying mission- and safety-critical systems that have become increasingly software reliant. This strategy is pursued in an international SEI, industry, and government collaboration. For aircraft, software as percentage of total system cost has grown from 33% in 1997 to 67% in 2010, with verification-related software rework cost alone exceeding 50%. Systems are currently verified against ambiguous, incomplete, and inconsistent requirements. Industry studies show that 70% of embedded software system defects are introduced in requirements and architecture design, while 80% are discovered post-unit test, with rework cost as much as 300–1,000 times the cost of in-phase correction.

The strategy involves a paradigm shift from build-then-test to an architecture-centric engineering approach that utilizes analytical virtual system integration based on the SAE Architectural Analysis & Design Language standard to discover problems earlier in the life cycle. This paradigm shift is being pursued by an international aerospace industry initiative known as System Architecture Virtual Integration, with return on investment studies showing major cost savings.

The strategy measurably improves requirement coverage through architecture-led requirement specification—incorporating operational requirements such as performance, timing, safety, reliability, and security—and systematically addressing hazards in the process. The strategy applies contract-based compositional verification one architecture layer at a time to ensure that requirements are addressed throughout the life cycle. Finally, the strategy incrementally manages an assurance plan and its execution throughout the life cycle, producing assurance case artifacts for certification.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Feiler

Peter Feiler

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Peter Feiler is a 29-year veteran and Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, working in the Architecture Practices Initiative. His current research interest is in improving the quality of safety-critical software-intensive systems through architecture-centric virtual integration and verification to reduce rework and qualification costs. Peter Feiler has been the technical lead and main author... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 10:35am - 11:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 3

10:35am

The Rest of the Story: From Product Process to Process Analysis
For planning and tracking the work to be performed, engineering teams have team processes, and individuals have personal processes. While these work well, the rest of the story—the steps needed to define and deliver products—may not be included. These additional steps are required to help people understand what they are going to accomplish and how to track the accomplishment.

While Meeting 3 of the team launch does include a step for defining a process for the products, it is often inadequate due to time available during the launch and the technique used to document the information. Inserting an event ahead of the launch called a Process Modeling Workshop is effective in helping teams capture product processes in a manner comparable to the Team Software Process. With a well-defined set of product processes, teams perform effectively as they generate top-down and bottom-up plans during launch. In addition, plans based on accurate processes also help with the effective identification of measurements to be captured during operations.

This presentation will demonstrate NAVAIR’s top-level approach to the relationship between product processes, the data collected and used during development, and how the data is used to analyze the quality of the product. It will also include a discussion of the process for future improvement.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Schwalb

Jeff Schwalb

NAVAIR
Jeff Schwalb is a computer scientist who has been with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division since 1984. In 2000, Jeff began working with the Systems Engineering Department at China Lake as a member of the People Product Process Resource (P3R) enterprise team to support Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) with improvement of organizational development and engineering processes as a way of delivering quality products on cost and schedule... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 10:35am - 11:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 4

10:35am

Common System and Software Testing Pitfalls
Projects, testing programs, and testers often fall into commonly occurring testing pitfalls that make testing unnecessarily less effective at uncovering defects, less efficient in terms of testing resources, and more frustrating to testing stakeholders. Based on the experience of many testers, we have developed a taxonomy of 127 common testing pitfalls organized into 18 categories. Each pitfall has been analyzed and documented in terms of title, identifier, description, potential applicability, characteristic symptoms, potential negative consequences, potential causes, recommendations, and related pitfalls. The first 92 pitfalls were documented in the book Common System and Software Testing Pitfalls: How to Prevent and Mitigate Them. Since the book manuscript was baselined for publication, a further 35 pitfalls and four pitfall categories have been identified, analyzed, and documented.

It is our intent that they form the industry de facto standard taxonomy of testing pitfalls and will be widely used for the following:

  1. Training materials for testers and testing stakeholders
  2. Standard terminology regarding commonly occurring testing pitfalls
  3. Checklists for use when producing test plans and related documentation; evaluating contractor proposals, test plans and related documentation (quality control), and as-performed test process (quality assurance); and identifying test-related risks and their mitigation approaches
  4. Categorization of pitfalls for metrics collection

Speakers
avatar for Donald Firesmith

Donald Firesmith

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Donald Firesmith is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, where for the last 11 years he been helping the U.S. Department of Defense and other governmental agencies acquire large, complex, software-intensive systems. His areas of expertise include requirements engineering, system and architecture engineering, object-oriented development, situational method engineering, and testing. He has... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 10:35am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

11:20am

Introduction to Software Product Lines
A software product line is a set of software-intensive systems sharing a common, managed set of features that satisfy the specific needs of a particular market segment or mission and that are developed from a common set of core assets in a prescribed way. Organizations developing a portfolio of products as a software product line are experiencing order-of-magnitude improvements in cost, time to market, staff productivity, and quality of the deployed products.

This presentation will introduce the essential activities and underlying practice areas of software product line development. It will review the basic concepts of software product lines, discuss the costs and benefits of product line adoption, introduce the SEI Framework for Software Product Line Practice(SM) guidelines, and describe approaches to applying the practices of the framework.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Donohoe

Patrick Donohoe

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Patrick Donohoe is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI), working in the Software Engineering and Acquisition Practices Directorate. His current interests are NoSQL data stores for health care and combining architecture and PSP/TSP-based diagnostics. He has participated in several product line technical probes and architecture evaluations and is an instructor in the SEI’s Software... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 11:20am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

11:20am

Using PSP/TSP in a Performance Review
Beckman Coulter has been using Team Software Process (TSP) since 2009, and today we have multiple TSP projects. This presentation will explore the use of Personal Software Process (PSP)/TSP data in the developers’ and testers’ performance reviews on two TSP projects. These two projects include 15 developers and 7 testers total. The projects include both new and maintenance development. Beckman Coulter uses a typical performance review process with goal setting in Q1 of the year, midterm reviews with managers, and final reviews with ratings at year’s end. Goals are weighted and ratings are 1 through 5, with 5 being the highest rating. The use of PSP/TSP in performance reviews for the two projects started informally in 2013 by holding developers and testers responsible for their schedule planning and general use of PSP data. There were no specific performance goals, however, and individuals were rated with subjective input from their functional manager. It was decided to be more formal for the 2014 performance year, and the manager developed specific goals based on the data and objectives of PSP/TSP. Individuals were brought into the process for goal setting, resulting in goals that strategically focused on both individual and team improvements. The 2014 performance goal objectives will be reviewed and discussed along with the results to date.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Flohr

Nicole Flohr

Beckman Coulter
Nicole Flohr has eight years of experience in developing medical device software at Beckman Coulter.  Nicole has been part of a TSP team for 5 years, first as a planning manager and now as a team lead. Nicole earned bachelor’s degrees in computer science and biology from the University of Minnesota, Morris, and a master's degree in software engineering from the University of St. Thomas.
avatar for Larry Whitford

Larry Whitford

Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Larry Whitford has been the head TSP coach for Beckman Coulter since July 2012 and was previously both a TSP coach and software QA for multiple projects. Larry joined Beckman Coulter in January 2008 and trained to be a PSP Instructor and TSP Coach in 2009. Larry has more than 30 years of experience as software QA in a variety of regulated industry and U.S. government projects. Larry started his software career while in the U.S. Air Force doing... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 11:20am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday November 4, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 2

1:00pm

Keynote: Wild, Wild West—How to Corral All Your Developers into Creating Secure Code
This keynote will discuss the many challenges facing chief information security officers when they are creating and maintaining the discipline necessary to ensure that their organizations implement secure coding practices. The options of using in-house developers, bringing in applications, and outsourcing to third- or fourth-party development teams expand the due diligence required to maintain a strong security posture.

Keynotes
avatar for Holly Ridgeway

Holly Ridgeway

Chief Information Security Officer, PNC Financial Services Group
Holly Ridgeway is the chief information security officer for the PNC Financial Services Group. In this role, Ridgeway leads the company's information security efforts with responsibility for PNC's overall information security assessment, testing, and vulnerability programs. Ridgeway, who joined PNC in September 2012, has 15 years of leadership experience in the federal government as an IT and cybersecurity professional, most recently as the... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 1

2:00pm

Open Space Kick-off
Facilitator
HG

Handerson Gomes

Pittsburgh Geek Out Days

Tuesday November 4, 2014 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Grand Station Ballroom 1

2:30pm

Afternoon Break
Tuesday November 4, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Station Foyer

3:00pm

A Zero-Depth Entry to Using TSP: How TSP Turned Around the Smart Grid Maturity Model Project
This presentation will describe how basic Team Software Process (TSP) principles were used to bring the Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM) project under control. The SGMM project is a non-software project composed of geographically dispersed, part-time resources from multiple departments within the organization. This presentation will follow the journey of the SGMM from conducting an initial project launch through developing two version releases of the SGMM product suite. It will discuss how the team first got its schedule under control, then focused on quality and cost. Particular attention will be paid to how MS Project was used to budget and track project costs, including manpower, travel, subcontractors, and all other expenses. We will also discuss how other aspects of the TSP were tailored to our situation including roles, lessons learned, and weaknesses with our approach.

Speakers
avatar for Summer Fowler

Summer Fowler

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for Julia Mullaney

Julia Mullaney

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ms. Mullaney has 25 years of experience in software development and software process improvement. She is an SEI-Certified PSP Developer, PSP Instructor, TSP Coach, and SGMM Navigator. Ms. Mullaney has been a member of the Smart Grid Maturity Model project since 2009 and has been the SEI project manager since 2012. She has participated in numerous SGMM Navigations, and she was a key contributor to the AMP SGMM project.


Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

3:00pm

The ACE (Accurate Confident Estimating) Process
The ACE Process was established to provide a structured approach to developing estimates for teams that are striving to make Accurate and Confident Estimates. It begins with preparation activities and leveraging existing data prior to a planning session, describes specific activities applied during the planning session, and defines key finalization activities. It includes the introduction of some Agile (Scrum) elements that have been proven to promote full participation at all times using some enjoyable and effective techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Wyrwa

Carl Wyrwa

CW Software Solutions, Inc.
Carl Wyrwa is the founder of CW Software Solutions, Inc., providing software best-practices consulting services. He specializes in the medical device field. He has over 39 years’ experience in medical device software development. He is a Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Partner, SEI-Certified Personal Software Process (PSP) Developer, SEI-Certified Team Software Process (TSP) Coach, SEI-Authorized TSP/PSP Instructor, and member of the... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

3:45pm

A Vendor Development Program: Smart Clients Are a Success Factor
The Performance and Capability Evaluation (PACE) establishes a framework to build the management capabilities that transform outsourcing companies into strategic business partners. Firms with an outsourcing strategy need data for decision making and need the ability to govern the service portfolio in order to enjoy the benefits of successful relationships with software providers. Internal resources’ skills correlate directly to the firm’s transformation success. To obtain this success, the client must help its provider succeed by helping it grow and improve capabilities and performance.

The PACE framework offers measurable goals, a baseline for process improvement, and a maturity path to documentation of metrics and performance reporting. This framework can support a Vendor Development Program based on the four dimensions of PACE: coverage, fidelity, performance, and customer satisfaction. It also provides the database structure to collect the vendors’ project data. Establishing this program poses a double challenge: it is not only one firm’s internal transformation; it also requires external firms’ transformation.

Speakers
avatar for Francisco Aleman

Francisco Aleman

Delaware Software
Jose Francisco Aleman earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the State University in Monterrey, a master’s degree with highest distinction in information technology from Carnegie Mellon University, and a master’s degree in IT management from Tecnológico de Monterrey. Aleman is an SEI-Certified PSP Developer and TSP Coach. He spent eight years working for a global IT firm as a software engineer, database... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:45pm - 4:25pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

3:45pm

SEMPRE: The TSP Software Engineering Measured Performance Repository
In 2013 SEI presented the first summary of process and projects statistics submitted by Team Software Process teams to the SEI. Since then, the more recent data using the Process Dashboard tool has been collected into a data warehouse provided by Tuma Solutions. This presentation will introduce data from this warehouse to the community and provide some initial benchmark statistics for use in project planning. Similarities and differences in how the data presented in 2013 are stored and retrieved will be discussed. We will also describe and present several “Fact Sheet” summaries that will be used to support some specific types of benchmarking and analysis.

Speakers
avatar for William Nichols

William Nichols

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
William Nichols is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, where he instructs PSP, coaches TSP teams, maintains the TSP, and conducts empirical research using TSP project data. Prior to coming to the SEI, William earned a PhD in physics at Carnegie Mellon University and developed scientific software for use in nuclear engineering.
avatar for Yasutaka Shirai

Yasutaka Shirai

Toshiba
Yasutaka Shirai is a research affiliate at the Software Engineering Institute from the Corporate Software Engineering Center at Toshiba. He conducts empirical research using TSP project data and has promoted corporate-wide process improvement in Toshiba as a Corporate-level SEPG member for more than 10 years.


Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:45pm - 4:25pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

3:45pm

Four Ways to Kill a Good Idea
Do you have a new idea? Do you have a proposal to try something different? Are you trying to sell a change initiative? If so, be prepared for the attacks coming your way from the resisters, the frightened, or the sometimes just plain mean people who don’t want you to succeed.

We have all experienced this problem, and in a very personal way, because it is an old, common, human, and increasingly important problem. The four common tactics that resisters to change routinely use are
  • fear-mongering: An attack strategy involves creating infectious anxiety, scaring others into believing that a good idea is far too risky to pursue.
  • delay: Stalling an idea with never-ending questions or requests for more meetings. A more creative approach is to focus attention on an urgent problem that, the attacker insists, can be resolved only if the new idea is put on hold.
  • confusion: Throw irrelevant numbers, facts, and convoluted questions into the discussion, and suddenly support starts to waver.
  • ridicule: A direct attack on you, the creator of the idea, engendering indirect doubts about the idea itself.
In this session, Dan will reveal strategies commonly used by your critics—and how to defend against them so that your idea survives to make a positive change.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Wall

Dan Wall

The Wall Group
Dan Wall has over 30 years of hands-on experience with multiple aspects of software development, including acquisition, development, quality assurance, and testing as an executive, manager, and developer. For the past 15 years, he has focused specifically as a process improvement practitioner and consultant using innovative, cutting-edge, and transformative solutions. As such, he has helped organizations decrease waste and add value, saving... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:45pm - 5:10pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

4:30pm

Advanced Modeling of Teaming Data to Enable Superior Team Performance
This presentation will describe periodic team survey data collection initiated at Hill Air Logistics Complex during 2014 that was analyzed and modeled using traditional statistical analysis and modern structural equation modeling (SEM). Results of the analysis and SEM will demonstrate how team performance may be enhanced through a focus on key team strengths and weaknesses associated with team practices discussed in TSP: Leading a Development Team, by Watts Humphrey. The authors seek to show the practicality of collecting such practice data and combining it with existing TSP data to reduce barriers to successfully implementing stronger team practices and achieving more sustainable team performance.

Speakers
DB

Dan Bennett

309th Software Maintenance Group, Hill Air Force Base
RC

Rushby Craig

309th Software Maintenance Group, Hill Air Force Base
Rushby Craig is the Measurement Analysis Team Lead in the 309th Software Maintenance Group, which implements and supports engineering tools for project planning, tracking, and implementation. The tools also enforce process fidelity and automate data collection. The team performs analysis of project and organizational measures to support decision making and develops process performance models to help predict outcomes related to important... Read More →
LM

Lance Moore

309th Software Maintenance Group, Hill Air Force Base
Lance Moore is the lead statistician in the 309th Software Maintenance Group involved in consultation for projects with process improvement regarding (1) estimation modeling, (2) survey creation and collection of data, and (3) peer review process improvement. Lance received his master’s degree in mathematics with an emphasis in statistics and has worked at the Census Bureau as a Mathematical Statistician for 9 years. He is currently pursuing... Read More →
avatar for Robert Stoddard

Robert Stoddard

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Robert Stoddard is a Principal Researcher at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) involved in research and customer work regarding (1) elicitation of unstated requirements at scale, (2) early lifecycle cost estimation, and (3) cybersecurity modeling. Robert is well published over a career spanning 24 years in industry followed by nine years at the SEI. Robert is a doctoral student in engineering management, with previous... Read More →
avatar for Dave Webb

Dave Webb

309th Software Maintenance Group, Hill Air Force Base
Dave Webb is a Senior Technical Program Manager in the 309th Software Maintenance Group and manages approximately 20 Department of Defense software projects comprising over 200 staff. Dave also mentors managers in planning, tracking, defect tracking, defect prevention, and process improvement. Dave is the Leader of the extended Engineering Process Group and is an SEI-Certified Personal Software Process Instructor and Team Software Process... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 4:30pm - 5:10pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

4:30pm

Tales from the Quality Journey
This presentation shares quality management experiences and resulting insights from a career of over 31 years in product development, manufacturing, management, and process improvement. We share a selection of stories from the first year to the present, such as
  • applying what we were taught
  • our first great team
  • producing near-zero-defect products
  • the ups and downs of tools and automation
  • design for the long term
  • simpler, smaller, better
  • losing things
  • the well-engineered, low-defect products that no one wanted
  • filtering out the defects
  • making reviews effective
  • preventing defects
We summarize these experiences and insights with our view of the required framework for achieving the highest product quality. Our experiences demonstrate that the best quality and performance are the result of the effective application across the organization of a collection of key principles and practices that are very broad in scope.

The stories and framework touch on a wide range of quality-related areas and practices, including leadership, teamwork, product management, customer needs and requirements, architecture and design, implementation, testing, configuration management, measurement, reviews, quality control and improvement, culture transformation, and customer support. We also relate our experiences, insights, and framework to guidance we have used over the years from our software engineering education, Total Quality Management, the Capability Maturity Model Integration, the Personal Software Process and Team Software Process, and Agile practices.

Speakers
avatar for Darryl Davis

Darryl Davis

Davis Systems
Darryl L. Davis is the Principal of Davis Systems, a process-improvement consulting firm and SEI Partner that helps develop high-performance software teams. He is a PMI-Certified Project Management Professional and an SEI-Certified TSP Mentor Coach, Authorized PSP Instructor, and Certified PSP Developer. Before founding Davis Systems in 1993, he was a Senior Technical Manager at Intergraph Corporation. There and at Chrysler Corporation, he... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 4:30pm - 5:10pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

5:15pm

Reception
Tuesday November 4, 2014 5:15pm - 7:30pm
Reflections Rooms
 
Wednesday, November 5
 

7:30am

Morning Beverages
Wednesday November 5, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am
Grand Station Foyer

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday November 5, 2014 7:30am - 3:30pm
Grand Station Foyer

8:15am

Opening Remarks
Wednesday November 5, 2014 8:15am - 8:30am
Grand Station Ballroom 1

8:30am

Keynote: Information Flow: The Secret to Successful Teamwork

Video-game development is arguably one of the most difficult kinds of software development due to its combination of performance requirements, diverse team, immovable deadlines, and the fact that the software must be more than functional, it must also be fun. In this talk, Jesse Schell explains what he has learned from 20 years of professional game development about the secret forces that help teams succeed or cause them to fail.


Keynotes
avatar for Jesse Schell

Jesse Schell

CEO, Schell Games
Jesse Schell is the CEO of Schell Games, a leader in creating transformational games. Since starting his company in 2002, he has grown it into the largest and most successful game development company in Pennsylvania. Under his leadership, Schell Games has produced an amazing array of innovative, transformational, and award-winning entertainment experiences for some of the world's most respected brands, such as Disney, SeaWorld Parks and... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 8:30am - 9:30am
Grand Station Ballroom 1

9:35am

Insider Threats in the Software Development Life Cycle
The software development life cycle presents a wide array of attack vectors for malicious insiders. The software produced, and its associated artifacts, are assets that an organization must protect. The data collected by or entered into software can be the target of theft, tampering, and other types of malicious activity. The business processes automated by software can be severely impacted when software is faulty or services are unavailable. Through the CERT Division's insider threat research, we have collected numerous cases in which insiders exploited vulnerabilities in software development processes to cause harm to their organizations. In this presentation, we discuss patterns and trends in these cases, focusing on similarities in attack techniques, targets, and motivations. We also present mitigation strategies for commonly exploited vulnerabilities and make the case for the creation of a secure software development process as a critical piece of a robust insider threat program.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Costa

Daniel Costa

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Daniel Costa is a Cyber Security Solutions Developer in the Cyber Security Solutions (CS2) Directorate of the CERT Division at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. Dan designs, develops, and transitions tools, solutions, and exercises that support the missions of CS2 and the CERT Division. Prior to joining the CERT Division, Dan was a Software Engineer at Applied Programming Technology, Inc., a company that develops nuclear... Read More →
avatar for Randall Trzeciak

Randall Trzeciak

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Randy Trzeciak is Technical Manager of the CERT Division’s Enterprise Threat and Vulnerability Management Team and the CERT Insider Threat Center at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. The team assists organizations in improving their security posture and incident response capability by researching technical threat areas; developing and conducting information security assessments; and providing information, solutions, and... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:35am - 10:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 5

9:35am

Reducing the Cost of Quality Across an Organization: ATK’s Experience
ATK’s Information Technology organization has geographically dispersed resources at many of the operating divisions across the county. Although all IT divisions face unique, specific challenges, they also have much in common. This includes the need to improve cycle time, reduce cost of quality, increase capacity, and operate with a LEAN mentality.

This presentation shows our distinct approach of applying a grassroots Personal Software Process (PSP) movement coupled with higher level initiatives. Through this approach, we are gaining great local, organization-specific results, but more importantly, momentum for true ATK-wide performance. These techniques are being used beyond software development and engineering to drive improvement in packaged software implementations, server and network infrastructure, and business process.

The focus has been to improve four areas:
  1. Reduce cost of quality of software development and software engineering across the corporation.
  2. Improve the overall maturity of approach and skill set in the IT department by implementing quality processes.
  3. Reduce cost of quality on COTS applications, server and network infrastructure, and business processes.
  4. Streamline testing by automating testing of key enterprise systems.
This presentation will continue the story where it was left off last year, review how ATK has been working to address each of these goals, and assess the challenges and successes of each.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Brady

Jason Brady

Alliant Techsystems
Dr. Jason Brady is a Director of Business Systems for ATK. He has over 12 years of management experience leading teams in information technology. Roles have included managing application development, enterprise architecture, infrastructure and desktop services, and business intelligence. Key work has involved designing and implementing large-scale enterprise systems including ERP/MRP, labor, and BI for 27 business units with over 3,000 employees... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:35am - 10:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 4

9:35am

The Impact of the PSP on Software Quality: Eliminating the Learning Effect Threat Through a Controlled Experiment
Data from the Personal Software Process (PSP) courses indicates that the PSP improves the quality of the developed programs. However, since the programs (exercises of the course) are in the same application domain, the improvement could be due to programming repetition. In this research, we try to eliminate this threat to validity in order to confirm that the quality improvement is due to the PSP. In a previous study, we designed and performed a controlled experiment with software engineering undergraduate students at the Universidad de la República. The students performed the same exercises of the PSP course but without applying the PSP techniques. Here we present a replication of this experiment. The results indicate that the PSP and not programming repetition is the most plausible cause of the important software quality improvements.

Speakers
avatar for Fernanda Grazioli

Fernanda Grazioli

Universidad de la República
Fernanda Grazioli is a research assistant in the Engineering School at the Universidad de la República (UdelaR). She is also a member of the Software Engineering Research Group (GrIS) at the Instituto de Computación (INCO). Grazioli holds an engineering degree in computer science from UdelaR and a Master of Science in Computer Science from the same university.
SM

Silvana Moreno

Universidad de la República
Silvana Moreno is a teaching and research assistant at the Engineering School at the | Universidad de la República (UdelaR). She is a member of the Software Engineering | Research Group (GrIS) at the Instituto de Computación (INCO). Moreno holds an engineering degree in computer science from UdelaR and a Master of Science in Computer Science from the same university. She is currently doing her doctoral work in computer science.
LP

Leticia Pérez-Queiruga

Universidad de la República
Leticia Pérez is an assistant professor in the Engineering School at the Universidad de la | República (UdelaR). She is also a member of the Software Engineering Research Group | (GrIS) at the Instituto de Computación (INCO). Pérez holds an engineering degree in | computer science and a Master of Science in Computer Science, both of them obtained at the UdelaR.
avatar for Diego Vallespir

Diego Vallespir

Universidad de la República
Diego Vallespir is an assistant professor in the Engineering School at the Universidad de la República (UdelaR), director of the Informatics Professional Postgraduate Center at UdelaR, director of the Software Engineering Research Group (GrIS) at UdelaR, and researcher at PEDECIBA-Informatics. Vallespir holds an engineering degree in computer science, a Master of Science in Computer Science, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science, all of... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:35am - 10:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 3

10:15am

Morning Break
Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:15am - 10:30am
Grand Station Foyer

10:35am

An Extension of the PSP PROBE Process to Help Students Make More Reliable Estimates in Early Stages of PSP Training
Students experience significant over- or underestimates in new program development when it follows the Personal Software Process (PSP) PROBE process. This presentation overviews how this potential problem can be reduced or solved by extending the PSP PROBE process.

A strategy is to find a logical evaluation combination of the productivity, correlation, and β1 and β0 used in the PROBE process. The estimated average size and time for a new program to be developed are obtained when method C is selected. The estimated proxy size is obtained for the new program through the PSP relative size table applied to the conceptual design. The estimated average size replaces the estimated proxy size when a student selects method C. If the estimated average size is not reasonably consistent with the past productivity data, the student should select method D for the size estimate. The similar discussion holds for the time estimate.

Another extension that is effective in the PSP PROBE process is to allow selecting method A or B when high correlations are recognized between the estimate and actual values, regardless of whether β0 or β1 satisfies the desired conditions respectively described in the PSP PROBE process, although the PROBE process suggests selecting method C for these cases.

After this extended PROBE process was presented, PSP students demonstrated reaching fewer over- or underestimates on the size and time of new programs.

Speakers
avatar for Yoshihiro Akiyama

Yoshihiro Akiyama

Next Process Institute, Ltd.
Yoshihiro Akiyama is a Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Affiliate; founder and CEO of Next Process Institute, Ltd.; and Visiting Professor at Kyushu Institute of Technology. He provides PSP Instructor and TSP Coach Training as an SEI TSP Strategic Partner for software organizations and academic institutions in Japan and Southeast Asia and Introduction to CMMI for Development training as a CMMI Partner. After receiving his... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:35am - 11:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 3

10:35am

TSP History and Evolution at Cadence Design Systems
Cadence has been deploying TSP to its R&D organization since 2011. With our large R&D organization of more than 3000 engineers, which is geographically, organizationally, and technologically diverse, we found many challenges in achieving fast, widespread adoption. In 2013, we applied the basic principles of TSP to our TSP deployment effort and developed an alternative approach. That approach, named Cadence Development Engineer Training (CaDET), was developed in the second half of 2013 and early 2014 and has been under active deployment since March 2014. Here we present the history of our TSP deployment, the challenges that led us to evolve our deployment methodology, and the results of that evolution: CaDET.

Speakers
avatar for Elias Fallon

Elias Fallon

Cadence Design Systems, Inc.
Elias Fallon is an Engineering Director in the Quality Initiative team at Cadence Design Systems, Inc. He’s worked there since 2004 when Cadence acquired Neolinear, a startup focus on analog design automation. At Cadence, Fallon has worked as a R&D Team Lead, Release Manager and a variety of other special assignments in Cadence R&D. He is currently a certified PSP Instructor, TSP Coach, and TSP Mentor Coach. Fallon holds a BS and MS... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:35am - 11:15am
Grand Station Ballroom 4

10:35am

The Internet of Things and Insecure Design

Since its inception in 1988, the CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC) has been analyzing and coordinating software vulnerabilities. The CERT/CC’s vulnerability response process includes discovering and reporting, analyzing, coordinating with vendors (software development organizations), and public disclosure. The results of this work are documented in the Vulnerability Notes Database. One observation highlights a disconnect between software engineering, design, and development practices and constantly evolving threats posed to highly interconnected software and systems.

The CERT/CC contributed to the Data-Driven Software Assurance (DDSA) project recently published by the SEI. A significant area of the DDSA research investigated operational vulnerabilities that “likely had their origins early in the life cycle, in the requirements and design phases.” To give one example, the lack of threat modeling, particularly in emerging domains, leads to insecurity.

This session will provide background on and examples of the life cycle of vulnerabilities, with the goal of improving the connection between software development and increased operational security. The session will also highlight design-related causes of vulnerabilities and software security issues affecting the growing “Internet of Things.”


Speakers
avatar for Art Manion

Art Manion

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Art Manion is a senior member of the Vulnerability Analysis team in the CERT Coordination Center at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI). He has studied vulnerabilities and coordinated responsible disclosure efforts since joining CERT in 2001, where he gained mild notoriety for saying "Don't use IE" in a conference presentation. Manion currently focuses on projects including software component relationships, vulnerability management, and... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:35am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

11:20am

Experiences from TSP Implementation in Clusters
How do you implement Team Software Process (TSP) on a national scale? Mexico has worked similarly to a TSP team in planning and developing a national rollout for TSP implementation. Mexico is convinced that alone we can do so little, but together we can do so much. We are also convinced that TSP is the key to build and grow small and medium enterprises and to achieve a global position in IT software development. Organizations such as INFOTEC, ITESM, SIE Center, Kernel, and Delaware are sharing TSP benefits across the country in a clustered way.

In this presentation, we will show how INFOTEC led a national TSP initiative to share TSP benefits from promotion to implementation, from training to piloting, from coaching to mentoring, and even in some clusters to achieve a PACE certification. We discuss how the country worked together to develop a national plan starting with a five-state pilot run to drive excellence in performance measures.

This presentation will include overall results in each of the five states. We will include the State TSP Initiative Implementation Plan, Personal Software Process training results, TSP pilot results, and PACE results for different organizations, making a comparison of how each state worked through the national TSP initiative. We will share our lessons learned and our improvement proposals.

Speakers
avatar for Sergio Carrera

Sergio Carrera

INFOTEC
Sergio Carrera holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and a master’s degree in administration from the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey. In 2010, he became CEO of the Fondo de Información y Documentación para la Industria, INFOTEC. Mr. Carrera served as Director General of Internal Commerce and Digital Economy in the Ministry... Read More →
avatar for Alfonso Alva Rosano

Alfonso Alva Rosano

SIE Center
Alfonso Alva Rosano is the founder and CEO of Software Industry Center Mexico, a company whose activities include consulting, training, certification, and research and development in quality models for the IT industry. Before that, he was President of the Information Technologies Institute at the Tecnológico de Monterrey and Executive Director of Manufacturing and Technology at IBM Mexico. He has also served as President of the Jalisco... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 11:20am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

11:20am

Under N: Acceptance to Delivery in N Hours
How about delivering a business need from acceptance to production in less than 12 hours? Or delivering in the absolute time it would actually take—not an hour more and not an hour less? Under-N methodology provides a framework to uncover hidden capabilities within IT applications and IT application teams and then to use the capabilities to deliver a business need, change, or want in under N hours, where N is the absolute time it takes to deliver. It also elicits capabilities that may not yet be present but that are possible, while outlining four atomic change capabilities that, when implemented, will enable IT applications to deliver changes in an under-N fashion by mixing and matching. The Under-N Framework relies on strong collaboration, planning, and tight teamwork. The presentation outlines a template to frame these capabilities by asking the right questions to procure all the answers that will be needed to execute the capability and to engage the correct stakeholders. In addition, the presenter proposes ways to scale the capabilities across an enterprise by means of a challenge process and by celebrating the best.

Speakers
avatar for Umashankar Velusamy

Umashankar Velusamy

Verizon Communications, Inc.
Umashankar Velusamy is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff with Verizon Communications, Inc. He has over 14 years of experience in the IT industry and has an Executive MBA degree from the University of South Florida. Having successfully executed many critical IT projects with innovative approaches, he is a named inventor in 11 granted U.S. patents and has many more pending patents in multiple disciplines. He is currently part of Verizon’s... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 11:20am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday November 5, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 2

1:00pm

Keynote: When You Build It, They Will Come
Hackers, vandals, voyeurs, hacktivists, thieves, organized crime groups, industrial espionage actors, terrorists, nation-states, and others have all discovered the power of our software-intensive, network-connected systems and have learned how to attack and compromise those systems to achieve their objectives. The systems we’ve built are under attack constantly, and seldom does a day go by without a report of a large-scale attack making front-page news. A small subset of headlines from just one week in August 2014 includes
  • “FBI, Secret Service Investigate Reports of Cyber Attacks on U.S. Banks” (Reuters)
  • “Home Depot Confirms Hack; Cyber Attack Could Affect Customer Credit Cards” (Huffington Post)
  • “300 Oil Companies Hacked in Norway” (The Local)
  • “Cyber Attacks Cause Data Loss to Community Health Systems” (SPAMfighter)
  • “ISIS Claims Sony Cyber Attack, Makes Bomb Threat Against Senior Exec John Smedley” (news.com.au)
Software developers must understand that the software they produce is likely, no matter what its function, to become the target of an attack at some point. It may provide the attackers a path to the data they want, access to other parts of a system or network, or a place to hide malware that will be activated later. Increased awareness of the problem is leading to a reinvigorated emphasis on software assurance with a corresponding increase in methods, tools, and techniques to improve the “built-in” security qualities of newly developed software.

This talk will characterize the evolving threat and provide pointers to methods, tools, technologies, and forums designed to help software developers produce software able to withstand the attacks it is sure to face.

Keynotes
avatar for Richard Pethia

Richard Pethia

Director of the CERT Program, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Richard Pethia is the Director of the CERT Program at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). The program conducts research and development activities to produce technology and systems management practices that help organizations recognize, resist, and recover from attacks on networked systems. The program’s CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC) has formed a partnership with the Department of Homeland Security to provide a... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 1

2:05pm

A Development Methodology Journey

From the beginning of a little process to the start of a hybrid Scrum-Team Software Process (TSP) product development process, the presenters will describe the two-year development methodology journey of a fast-growing company leading solutions for medical device information systems. The hybrid development method is a perfect example of TSP as a data and process framework combined with the best of Scrum practices and adapted to the regulated environment of health care. The presenters will explain how the journey evolved from the launch of one small software development TSP team to cross-functional hybrid team launches.


Speakers
avatar for Hassan Annous

Hassan Annous

Capsule Tech, Inc.
Hassan Annous is an R&D Continuous Improvement Lead at Capsule Tech, Inc. He facilitates process improvement in research and development and coaches software development teams in using the Team Software Process as a continuous-improvement and team-building framework. He is also a certified Scrum master. Prior to joining Capsule Tech, he worked at OSD Services as the Software Test & Quality Assurance Lead. Annous has a bachelor’s... Read More →
avatar for Damien Galzi

Damien Galzi

Capsule Tech, Inc.
Damien Galzi is Manager of Release Management at Capsule Tech, Inc., which includes research and development, continuous improvement, application lifecycle management, and system verification and validation. He is also a Certified Project Management Professional, Team Software Process Coach, and Scrum master. Prior to joining Capsule Tech, he worked at AUSY, an international consulting and engineering firm, as a project director. Galzi received... Read More →
avatar for Jean-Xavier Rigal

Jean-Xavier Rigal

Capsule Tech, Inc.
Jean-Xavier Rigal is the Head of Software Engineering at Capsule Tech, Inc., where he is in charge of development, verification, and maintenance for flagship products such as the DataCaptor Solution. He is also a certified Scrum master, an SEI-Certified Personal Software Process Developer, and an early Team Software Process adopter. Before joining Capsule Tech, he was a Software Development Manager for Medicsight, an industry leader in developing... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 2:05pm - 2:45pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

2:05pm

Architecture Best Practices for Project and Technical Leaders
Architecture development is one of the earliest, key identifiers of potential risks in a project’s development life cycle. Architecture provides the foundation for the project’s entire life cycle and is used to help address the important areas of a project such as design, schedule, estimates, testing, users’ satisfaction, team structure, and training. TSP makes use of and expands on these areas. For example, an architecture development process that includes estimating architecture development effort based on quality attribute scenarios fits nicely into the initial conceptual design efforts. Taking an architecture-informed approach and inferring its implications and impacts for a project’s development success is a key skill that leaders need in order to identify risks at the start of a project or determine a baseline for an existing project. This presentation describes a set of architecture best practices based on experiences working with commercial and government departments and agencies in the areas of software, system, enterprise architecture, and system-of-systems development.

The architecture best practices focus on four areas: visual representations, specifications, processes, and acquisition. In these four areas, two levels of supporting artifacts are identified and integrated in a timeline to help a leader plan for a new project, support assessing a project’s current health, and develop a baseline from which to identify areas for process improvement. The first level provides a minimalist framework that will work for a project of any size to provide an architecture-informed snapshot. The second level is more comprehensive and will lend itself better to larger projects.

Speakers
avatar for Felix Bachmann

Felix Bachmann

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Felix Bachmann is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute in the Architecture Practices Initiative. He is co-author of the Attribute-Driven Design Method, a contributor to and instructor for the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) Evaluator Training, and a co-author of the book Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond. He was the coach of Bursatec’s architecture... Read More →
avatar for Jim McHale

Jim McHale

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
James McHale is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). He joined the SEI in 1999 following 20 years in industry as a software engineer, system designer, project leader, and manager, including projects on control systems for diverse applications such as steel mills, power plants, robotics, and transportation. McHale is an authorized TSP coach and a SCAMPI Lead Appraiser candidate... Read More →
avatar for Tim Morrow

Tim Morrow

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Tim Morrow is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in the Software Solutions Division. He develops and implements architecture-centric approaches to support the acquisition, development, and analysis of SoS, system, and software architectures for DoD and non-DoD programs. Before joining the SEI, he was a hardware diagnostic manager at Marconi Communications, a... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 2:05pm - 2:45pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

2:05pm

TSP-PACE: Process and Capability Evaluation, an Experience Report
Tecnológico de Monterrey and the Software Engineering Institute began the Team Software Process (TSP) organization evaluation process in 2008 and completed initial pilots of the Process and Capability Evaluation (PACE) in 2013. The effort has been partially funded by the Mexican government not only in order to assure that Mexican companies implement the TSP effectively but also to have national statistics to demonstrate the improving status of Mexican industry. Continuing with the TSP-PACE, we have evaluated more than 10 organizations in Mexico, using a combination of TSP data, project records, and on-site review. We present some results of the evaluations conducted and describe how the evaluations support both organizational performance improvement and national benchmarking. This presentation will discuss different approaches from the companies to meet their goals.

Speakers
avatar for Antonio Mejorado

Antonio Mejorado

Tec de Monterrey
Antonio Mejorado is a full-time professor at Tecnológico de Monterrey University in Mexico, where he interacts with organizations to instruct PSP and to coach PSP teams and works with the Software Engineering Institute to use TSP-PACE in companies. Before he began teaching at Tecnológico de Monterrey, Antonio was developing software as a computer science engineer. He obtained his degree from Tecnológico de Monterrey University.
avatar for William Nichols

William Nichols

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
William Nichols is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, where he instructs PSP, coaches TSP teams, maintains the TSP, and conducts empirical research using TSP project data. Prior to coming to the SEI, William earned a PhD in physics at Carnegie Mellon University and developed scientific software for use in nuclear engineering.
avatar for Rafael Salazar

Rafael Salazar

Tec de Monterrey
Rafael Salazar is a full-time professor at Tecnológico de Monterrey University in Mexico, where he leads the Mexican TSP Initiative in collaboration with the Mexican government, the Mexican software industry, and the Software Engineering Institute. He trains PSP Instructors, TSP Coaches, PSP Developers, management, and executives. He also coaches TSP teams and mentors TSP provisional coaches. Prior to joining Tecnológico de Monterrey, Rafael... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 2:05pm - 2:45pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

2:45pm

Afternoon Break
Wednesday November 5, 2014 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Grand Station Foyer

3:15pm

Evolving Postmortems as Teams Evolve Through TxP
In working with TPI (Team Process Integration) teams in NAVAIR, patterns are beginning to emerge concerning which topics to focus on when performing postmortems. Showing a team how it has improved in some aspect is a very strong motivating factor to help the team embrace process improvement and to show how easily improvement can be achieved. First postmortems, therefore, are important in sustaining a team’s interest in process improvement. As a team evolves and begins to use more complex plans, more extensive postmortems become possible. We have developed a standard set of postmortem topics that can be introduced piecewise as a team gains experience and that can be analyzed regardless of that team’s domain. Standardization allows organizational managers to become familiar with the charts presented in the postmortem out-briefs, which, in turn, show management that the team is improving its performance in some aspect, regardless of whether the team is well on its way to becoming a TxP (Team-X-Process) team or just starting the TPI. The presentation will walk through the graphs that have been most effective in presenting analysis results at the various levels of evolution as a team works toward becoming a TxP team. These analyses improve planning, improve communication with management, and sustain team interest in process improvement.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Hodgins

Brad Hodgins

NAVAIR
Brad Hodgins is an SEI-Certified Software Developer, SEI-Certified PSP/TSP Instructor, SEI-Authorized TSP Coach, and interim TSP Mentor Coach for the Process Resource Team of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) at China Lake, California. He developed a process framework for engineering teams and was awarded a Navy patent for the Learning Applying Mastering Perfecting model for team process implementation evaluation and improvement. Brad has... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 3:15pm - 3:55pm
Grand Station Ballroom 5

3:15pm

Scrum: Creating Great Products and Critical Systems – What to Worry About, What’s Missing, and How to Fix it
The interest in Agile/Scrum software development practices continues to grow as companies seek more efficient methods of developing software while meeting market demands for delivery. Scrum is a software development methodology based on Agile principles. Agile methodologies promote a project management process that encourages frequent inspection and adaptation; a leadership philosophy using teamwork, self-organization, and accountability; and strong customer involvement.

However, Scrum/Agile implementations don't always go as planned, and without some due diligence, chaos is easy. In this session, Neil enumerates the problems to look out for and provides example corrective actions:

• Scrum/Agile overview
• What to use from the Agile Manifesto
• Definition of Scrum
• Scrum risks to look out for and what to do about them:
   – Mistaking speed for progress (many components developed that don’t work together)
   – One-liner requirements (the devil is in the details)
   – Missing architecture/design
   – Missing final system test/validation
   – Missing configuration management
   – Missing risk management
   – Missing process assurance (known as ScrumBut)

Speakers
avatar for Neil Potter

Neil Potter

The Process Group
Neil Potter is co-founder of The Process Group, a company formed in 1990 that consults on process improvement, software engineering, and project management. Neil has 26 years of experience in software and process engineering. He is an SEI-certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Intro to CMMI instructor, Six Sigma Greenbelt, and Certified Scrum Master. He has a B.Sc. in computer science from the University of Essex (UK) and is the co-author of Making... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 3:15pm - 3:55pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

3:15pm

Software Architecture Decision-Making Techniques
Many architects and leads suffer from analysis paralysis. This session will give them a proven set of techniques to apply to all their software design decisions and build their confidence in their design decisions. Software architecture and design decision making falls under the category of “Wicked Problems.” There are no right answers. This session will cover three aspects of making decisions to help the audience go back to their teams and make better decisions. The aspects covered include philosophies, actions, and psychologies of decision-making techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Bett Correa

Bett Correa

Verizon Communications
Bett Correa—Distinguished Toastmaster, former Presidents Distinguished Division Governor in Toastmasters, and winner of the Division Governor of the Year award—has been in IT since 1999, first as a developer and for the last six years as a Solutions Architect at Verizon. Bett also cohosts the Software Architecture Concepts Podcast. Now, she is driving Customer Experience Architecture at Verizon to improve the processes and customer... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 3:15pm - 3:55pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

4:00pm

Open Space Closing
Facilitator
BG

Brian Gray

Pittsburgh Geek Out Days

Wednesday November 5, 2014 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Grand Station Ballroom 1

4:30pm

Conference Wrap-up
Speakers
AC

Anita Carleton

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute


Wednesday November 5, 2014 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 1
 
Thursday, November 6
 

7:30am

Morning Beverages
Thursday November 6, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am
Grand Station Foyer

7:30am

Registration
Thursday November 6, 2014 7:30am - 10:30am
Grand Station Foyer

8:30am

T6: Business Model Canvas and Product Canvas
The TSP Launch assumes that the marketing or product manager can explain the product needs to the TSP team: a Product Backlog exists. But how is the Product Backlog created? This workshop will guide attendees from creating a Vision Statement to a Business Model Canvas, a Product Canvas, and a Minimal Viable Product backlog.

The Business Model Canvas is a method for visualizing a product’s value proposition, infrastructure, customers, and finances in a single chart. Because it provides an overview of the value stream that the TSP team will work on, this template can explain the state of the business and provide a strategic overview. While dynamic, this Business Model Canvas is typically not updated daily. It is updated periodically or during a TSP relaunch to revalidate the viability and feasibility of the product given current market conditions.

The Product Canvas brings together information necessary to create a new product. The Product Canvas is intended to provide enough specificity to serve as input for identifying Epics and Stories that the TSP team will implement. The Product Canvas is the nexus between strategy captured in the Business Model Canvas and the concrete Epics and Stories needed by the TSP team. It is typically updated every few weeks to ensure that the TSP team is aligned with the strategy and vision while clear on the Epics and Stories that they will execute shortly.

In this interactive workshop, we will use a combination of short lectures interspersed with sessions using big wall charts to create the Business Model Canvas and Product Canvas for several well-known products. Alternatively, attendees can work on a current product relevant to their work. Once we have defined Product Backlog Items, we will use Story Mapping techniques to develop a Minimal Viable Product. The workshop can accommodate any number of attendees: we will bring enough wall charts for teams of 7 ± 2 attendees to create the canvases.

Speakers
avatar for Noopur Davis

Noopur Davis

McAfee
Noopur Davis is VP of Global Quality at McAfee and ensures that Intel Security consistently produces high-quality software and hardware products. She leads quality initiatives associated with McAfee’s entire product line to ensure that McAfee’s product development processes incorporate industry-leading best practices. Previously, Davis was Principal of Davis Systems, a Software Management Consulting firm; a Visiting Scientist and... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 8:30am - 12:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 4

8:30am

T5: Eliciting Unstated Requirements

Have you ever worked on a software project that didn’t result in what the users really wanted? Stakeholders often have requirements that they aren’t aware of. Uncovering them can be challenging and involves ways of thinking not found in more traditional elicitation approaches. It requires probing interviews and expanded use of context information that go well beyond what the requirements engineer typically achieves with a specification-driven process. It requires a method that transforms stakeholders’ tacit knowledge into themes of experience so that insightful and innovative requirements can emerge.

The KJ+ method for eliciting unstated requirements, currently under development by a research team at the Software Engineering Institute, helps determine the unstated needs of the varied stakeholders typical of today’s large, diverse software projects. This method will be scalable to address the needs of multiple categories of stakeholders; be usable by a diverse, non-collocated team of requirements analysts; and result in a more complete set of requirements for subsequent system design, implementation, and sustainment. It can be used to support both traditional requirements specifications and Agile user stories.

This tutorial will present the traditional KJ method for eliciting unstated user needs and the extensions that allow KJ to be used in a virtual environment. Also included are activities integral to learning the KJ+ method:

  • Role-playing interviews to elicit unstated needs and their context
  • Distilling interview notes into context-rich need statements
  • Identifying affinity groups for the statements
  • Deriving unstated needs from the affinity groups
  • Categorizing the unstated needs as must-be’s, satisfiers, or delighters

Practitioners who are concerned with delivering exciting and innovative features will learn how to apply KJ+ in their own projects. Researchers will find the kinds of requirements obtained using KJ+ vs. more traditional approaches of interest.

 Learning Outcomes

  • Appreciate the opportunities lost due to missing requirements
  • Understand how to use the KJ and Kano analysis methods to identify and analyze unstated requirements
  • Understand how to tailor these methods for virtual environments

Speakers
avatar for Mary Beth Chrissis

Mary Beth Chrissis

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Mary Beth Chrissis is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute. She is currently assisting the Veterans Health Administration with strategic planning and piloting a new requirements elicitation technique called KJ+. She is an author of CMMI for Development: Guidelines for Process Integration and Product Improvement and The Capability Maturity Model: Guidelines for Improving the Software Process... Read More →
avatar for Mike Konrad

Mike Konrad

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Mike Konrad is a Principal Researcher in the Software Solutions Division who has been with the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) since 1988. His current work includes leading the Elicitation of Unstated Requirements at Scale project and contributing to the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) project. Prior to 2013, Konrad was Chief Architect of CMMI and Chair of the CMMI Configuration Control. Konrad... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Mead

Nancy Mead

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Nancy Mead is a Fellow and Principal Researcher at the Software Engineering Institute and an Adjunct Professor of Software Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She is currently involved in the study of security requirements engineering and the development of software assurance curricula. Mead has more than 150 publications and invited presentations and has a biographical citation in Who’s Who in America. She is a Fellow of the IEEE... Read More →
avatar for Robert Stoddard

Robert Stoddard

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Robert Stoddard is a Principal Researcher at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) involved in research and customer work regarding (1) elicitation of unstated requirements at scale, (2) early lifecycle cost estimation, and (3) cybersecurity modeling. Robert is well published over a career spanning 24 years in industry followed by nine years at the SEI. Robert is a doctoral student in engineering management, with previous... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 8:30am - 5:00pm
Grand Station Ballroom 3

10:00am

Morning Break
Thursday November 6, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Grand Station Foyer

12:00pm

Lunch
Thursday November 6, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
TBA

12:00pm

2:30pm

Afternoon Break
Thursday November 6, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Station Foyer